tatenoayako:

またまた3人でファイナル行くぞ!

tatenoayako:

またまた3人でファイナル行くぞ!

bobbybernethy:

I found Michael Weinstein’s collages a while back and I finally got around to trying one of my own.

bobbybernethy:

I found Michael Weinstein’s collages a while back and I finally got around to trying one of my own.

oakleyandallen:

JR Smith “Shots”

tatenoayako:

Ricky Rubio

tatenoayako:

Ricky Rubio

2006-2007 All Star race between a 44 year old Barkley, and a 67 year old Dick Bavetta


China is a lucrative market for WNBA stars, but the culture clash — and expectations — can make the transition difficult for a young player trying to improve her game. Griner, 23, has embraced her surroundings as best she can, trying to strike a balance between comfort and immersion. She stays up late, connecting with family and friends who are starting their day back in Houston. She also learns some Chinese from her teammates, hanging out with them in their hotel because, unlike Griner, they are forbidden to leave the premises without permission.
Every morning, Griner takes the elevator down to the hotel lobby, pushes through the revolving doors and then jaywalks across the street to Subway for a chicken teriyaki sub — exactly what she would order at home in the U.S. Food in hand, she heads to the arena, where she works on her own game and then later dutifully executes Li’s commands during practice, even if Griner and Demopoulos have a dozen ideas of how she could be used more effectively. “Here in China,” Griner says, “you just have to forget everything you know, or think you know, and be willing to accept a new set of rules.”

- WNBA star Brittney Griner adjusts to life in China

China is a lucrative market for WNBA stars, but the culture clash — and expectations — can make the transition difficult for a young player trying to improve her game. Griner, 23, has embraced her surroundings as best she can, trying to strike a balance between comfort and immersion. She stays up late, connecting with family and friends who are starting their day back in Houston. She also learns some Chinese from her teammates, hanging out with them in their hotel because, unlike Griner, they are forbidden to leave the premises without permission.

Every morning, Griner takes the elevator down to the hotel lobby, pushes through the revolving doors and then jaywalks across the street to Subway for a chicken teriyaki sub — exactly what she would order at home in the U.S. Food in hand, she heads to the arena, where she works on her own game and then later dutifully executes Li’s commands during practice, even if Griner and Demopoulos have a dozen ideas of how she could be used more effectively. “Here in China,” Griner says, “you just have to forget everything you know, or think you know, and be willing to accept a new set of rules.”

- WNBA star Brittney Griner adjusts to life in China

doublescribble:

Jungyeon Roh (Website / Facebook)

doublescribble:

Jungyeon Roh (Website / Facebook)

Gerald Green Serves it Off the Backboard to Himself for the Jam

NBA Behind The Scenes: I was a D-League coach - Lang Whitaker

DES MOINES – “Did you bring a suit?”
Iowa Energy coach Nate Bjorkgren looked me in the eye, ready to pass judgment on my ability to make the unprecedented leap from journalist to NBA Development League assistant coach. The room was dark except for a projector shining stats against a wall. It was almost as if I was in an interrogation room in a spy movie.
In four hours, the Energy would host the Tulsa 66ers in a game with playoff ramifications. At 25-17, the Energy had a shot at winning their division. The last thing Bjorkgren and his team needed was a distraction on their bench.
The thing was, I honestly felt like I could handle being an assistant coach, at least for a night. I’ve spent almost 15 years covering the NBA, and a lifetime playing and observing basketball at all levels. I coached a church league team for a few years and won a few titles by employing an aggressive zone defense and an offense best described as “let the best player take all the shots.”

The chance to be part of a real, professional game as a bona fide assistant, though? It was something I’d never considered. But it seemed like a great opportunity to pull back a curtain to a larger audience.

NBA Behind The Scenes: I was a D-League coach - Lang Whitaker

DES MOINES – “Did you bring a suit?”

Iowa Energy coach Nate Bjorkgren looked me in the eye, ready to pass judgment on my ability to make the unprecedented leap from journalist to NBA Development League assistant coach. The room was dark except for a projector shining stats against a wall. It was almost as if I was in an interrogation room in a spy movie.

In four hours, the Energy would host the Tulsa 66ers in a game with playoff ramifications. At 25-17, the Energy had a shot at winning their division. The last thing Bjorkgren and his team needed was a distraction on their bench.

The thing was, I honestly felt like I could handle being an assistant coach, at least for a night. I’ve spent almost 15 years covering the NBA, and a lifetime playing and observing basketball at all levels. I coached a church league team for a few years and won a few titles by employing an aggressive zone defense and an offense best described as “let the best player take all the shots.”

The chance to be part of a real, professional game as a bona fide assistant, though? It was something I’d never considered. But it seemed like a great opportunity to pull back a curtain to a larger audience.

Pacers' David West lives life the right way: his way

Indiana power forward provides ‘real leadership’ after experiences ranging from poetry to Katrina

West had a hard time reconciling his status as a highly paid professional basketball player with the city in which he made his wealth. Any sense of ego or self that emerged out of draft night in 2003 was shattered once he landed in New Orleans.

… “You go to certain parts of New Orleans and (if) you had a blindfold on and someone took the blindfold off, you would think you weren’t in America,” West said. “And I was having a difficult time getting paid a million or so dollars — and when I got into the NBA, I realized that I was on my own in feeling like that.

"(I’m like), ‘Yo! Nobody else sees that there’s something wrong here?’"

With this war waging in his mind, West found the locker room to be a lonely place. So as not to alienate himself, West subtly conformed.

The Breakdown of A Clydeism: 2013-14 Broadcast Statistics of Walt "Clyde" Frazier - Page 2 of 2 - StatsInsights